press

Soundroots

Morrocan-born Zarra conveys a strong sense of her North African roots through the vocals and arrangements. Fans of Susheela Raman and Natacha Atlas, or those looking for something like them but leaning a bit more toward jazz, should be sure to check out this strong debut.

Global Rhythm

Moroccan vocalist Malika Zarra is arriving at this crossroads from the opposite direction, infusing the music of her native culture with jazz.

Phil Freeman

 

The Guardian UK

 “Zarra is captivating, with a soft voice and a hushed style of scat-singing that makes it sound like she is casting spells”

Time out

Moroccan jazz-pop singer Malika Zarra fronts a band well-stocked with keen players

Time out

tags:

Aujourd'hui le Maroc

review Aujourd'hui le Maroc

D’origine marocaine, Malika Zarra, la chanteuse de jazz oriental évoluant sur la scène artistique new-yorkaise, dévoile quelques aspects de sa personnalité.

 

Amine Harmach

Le 16-07-2010

JAZZ.COM

Ms. Zarra became a focus of rapt attention....

tags:

Cadence

"Soothing and sultry rhythms buoyed by modal, Eastern grooves"

Troy Collins

 

Malika Zarra, du Maroc à New York

Sur la planète musicale marocaine émergent des talents originaux, tels l’auteur-compositeur Malika Zarra, installée à New York. L’originalité de cette artiste qui vient de sortir son premier album, On the ebony road est d’être l’une des rares femmes instrumentistes et compositeur.

tags:

Malika Zarra se produit à Washington

image

L’artiste marocaine Malika Zarra a animé un concert, récemment à Washington, dans le cadre de la 9ème édition du festival du mois de la francophonie, lancé le 26 février dans la capitale fédérale américaine. Mêlant jazz et musique traditionnelle marocaine, Malika Zarra, auteur, compositeur et interprète, chante en arabe, en français et en anglais, proposant au public des mélodies exotiques et originales.

tags:

a wonderful ambassador...

Malika Zarra, Moroccan vocalist, was a wonderful ambassador for her country’s music. She sang in native Moroccan, French, and English, with a healthy dose of scat. The music was similar to Afro-Caribbean, Flamenco, and Greek genres, with exotic percussion, and vocal dynamics that intensified as the evening grew late. Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower

tags:
Syndicate content